Time Out Sydney

This event has finished

The Royal Opera in Covent Garden teams up with Opera Australia for a world-class new production of Tchaikovsky's opus 

Pushkin is the Russians' Shakespeare, and his verse novel Yevgeniy Onegin (1831) has a position in popular and literary mindspace comparable to Romeo and Juliet, except that whereas Romeo is widely considered a hero who at worst bungles the true love of his bride (and pays with both their lives), Onegin is a bounder who rejects a clumsy written declaration of love by Tatyana, and both live to regret it.
Whereas the recidivist poet Shakespeare sneaks only a single sonnet ("If I profane") into a sprawling haystack of incident, Pushkin is all poetry and little action, which Tchaikovsky's 1879 opera pares back further, eliminating the suave narrative voice of his source. The result is dramatically sparse, but his music is fortunately powerful enough to sweep aside most objections from the intellect, especially when performed as beautifully as it is here by the Australian Opera and Ballet Orchestra, the OA Chorus and several knockout soloists.
The main problem for most of us who don't speak Russian is that Pushkin's poetry gets lost in the translation. So we have to rely on the composer conveying and occasionally counterpointing the emotions we read on the surtitles and on the faces of the actors. Lucky for us, merely the main couple here, the magnificent Slovak baritone Dalibor Jenis and OA's Nicole Car, looking so young and singing so very well, would justify a full house anywhere in the world. Now add a feisty Sian Pendry as Tatyana's headstrong sister Olga, and the smashing James Eggleston as her lover Lensky, and you're well above twice the price of admission.
But there's more: the bonus of Kanen Breen in a comic cameo prior to the duel between Onegin and Lensky, plus the magisterial Russian bass Konstantin Gorny as the prince Tatyana marries instead of Onegin. By then the Russian you don't know won't bother you: just go with the emotional flow, guided energetically and accurately by conductor Guillame Tourniaire.
Danish director Kasper Holten made a controversial decision to add a pair of mute younger versions of the two main characters, haunting their older selves with regret. Not everyone will appreciate this, nor the large withered branches and the dead body of Lensky left around for stage years. We liked both his concept and the designers' glowing and evocative execution, but if you prefer to close your eyes and just listen to this simple tale of failed love, the romantic misgivings you feel may not be as remote from Pushkin's intentions as the critics of Tchaikovsky and Holten might lead you to believe.

Kasper Holten on Eugene Onegin

 

He fell in love with opera at nine, was the head of the Royal Danish Opera by 27 – and is currently making waves as the artistic director of the Royal Opera at Covent Garden. See what all the fuss is about when Kasper Holten brings his controversial staging of Tchaikovsky’s masterpiece to Sydney.

Sign up to our monthly arts newsletter

By Jason Catlett   |   Photos by Lisa Tomasetti

Eugene Onegin details

Address
Bennelong Point, Sydney 2000

Telephone 02 9250 7111

Price $69.00 to $315.00

Date 28 Feb-28 Mar

Director: Kasper Holten; conductor Guillame Tourniaire

Cast: Nicole Car, Dalibor Jenis

Sydney Opera House map

Report a problem with this page

Restaurants and bars nearby

Opera Kitchen

107m - Nga Chu (aka Nahji) immigrated to Australia as a refugee from Laos in 1978....

Opera Bar

144m - Sydney, you really do put on a mighty fine show when the mood takes you....

Aria

347m - There are stories. Mysteries. Legends. And they’re all surrounding the...

More restaurants and bars nearby

Other venues nearby

Beulah Street Wharf

604m - One of the best views in town of Sydney Harbour from the north side.

Park Hyatt

623m - Since opening in 1990, the Park Hyatt has played host to a steady stream of...

More venues nearby

Readers' comments, reviews, hints and pictures

Community guidelines

blog comments powered by Disqus